Events

York: City Centre Keyhole Surgery
Increasing the Capacity and Performance
of Historic Centres

Thursday 27th June 2019, Friargate Meeting House, Lower Friargate, York YO1 9RL 

 

Inserting large scale mixed-use development into historic centres requires understanding, imagination and confidence. The all-embracing, all-or-nothing masterplan can work, but too often results in uncomfortable juxtapositions, poor economic performance or even complete failure.  Intelligent masterplanning allows corrections and adaptations over implementation phases to accommodate evolving understanding, exploit unexpected opportunities and respond to changing circumstances and expectations. All without undermining viability, compromising design quality or harming heritage assets.
York’s rich history represents centuries of urban evolution that continues today. This seminar and city exploration will interrogate plans for the future and the development that these are stimulating. 
Participants will hear from the City of York's Archaeologist, City officers leading the renovation of the Guildhall and Castle Gateway major projects and the masterplanners of Castle Gateway and York Central.  They will learn how community representatives have come together to define community briefs for new places. The walking tour, led by City officers, will set these places firmly in their historical context.
The Guildhall is part of York’s most prestigious and historically significant complex, comprising Grade I, II* and II listed buildings built around the 15th century hall and riverside meeting room. It has been the seat of civic governance since the 1200s, and yet has seen minimal maintenance since 1942 bombing raids. A renovation project will bring the Guildhall’s historic role into the 21st century with new office space, greater community use and green technology.

Castle Gateway is described by the community conversation platform My Future York as "... an opportunity to identify new future uses, buildings and public space with the overall aim to create a part of York that is valued, well-used and loved."  Regeneration will create retail, leisure and residential facilities, to complement and reinforce the vitality of the city centre. It will also enhance the setting of Clifford's Tower and the quality of public space and accessibility throughout the area. 
York Central, west of the city’s railway station and contained by rail lines, is one of the largest brownfield regeneration sites in England. With the National Railway Museum, private housing and businesses, the new neighbourhood has been designated a UK Government Housing and Enterprise Zone.
Programme
9.30am            Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45am            Welcome, David Warburton, Head of Regeneration Programmes (York Central and Guildhall complex), City of York Council City of York Council & Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10am               York: A Unique Heritage Context, David Fraser, York Civic Trust (TBC)
10.30am          Hungate and major city centre projects, John Oxley, City Archaeologist, City of York Council
10.50am       The Significance of the York Guildhall project, David Warburton, City of York Council
11.10am       York Central, Jason Syrett, Partner, Allies and Morrison
11.40am       Q&A followed by tea and coffee
12pm            Drawing out the Meaning of Place: York Castle Gateway
·         Castle Gateway Context and Objectives, Andy Kerr, Head of Regeneration Programmes (Castle Gateway and City Centre), City of York Council
·         Masterplanning the Castle Gateway, Francis Glare, Head of Urbanism, BDP
·         From Plan to Delivery – realising the vision for the Castle Gateway, Andy Kerr
12.45pm       Q&A followed by lunch
1.45pm           Community Engagement: My Future York, Dr Helen Graham, Leeds University and Phil Bixby, Constructive Individuals
2.15pm            Walking tour around York city centre
4.30pm            Close
This event counts as 5 hours of CPD. Join the HTVF now and save money - see http://www.htvf.org/Join/ for details.  This event is supported by:
 
 
 
 

Buxton: Resilient Cultural Heritage & the Role of the Visitor Economy

Thursday 17th October 2019 (please note new date)
University of Derby, Devonshire Road, Buxton, SK17 6RY
https://htvf-in-buxton.eventbrite.co.uk
Tickets £35-155
This seminar and walking tour will look at how heritage-led regeneration has delivered the newly redeveloped and restored Crescent, Natural Baths and Pump Room in Buxton.

As part of the Visitor Economy Strategy for Buxton, and the wider Peak District, this is an opportunity to hear from those directly involved in the projects, the developer The Osbourne Group's approach, and then visit the Devonshire Dome, Buxton Opera House, Crescent and Thermal Spa in advance of its opening to the public.

Programme

9:30am          Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45am          Welcome, Sarah Rawlinson Head of Centre for Contemporary Hospitality and Tourism, University of Derby & Louise Thomas, Director, HTVF
 
10am             Introduction to Buxton and its heritage challenges and regeneration, Richard Tuffrey, Special Advisor, Buxton Crescent Heritage Trust and formerly Conservation Officer, High Peak Borough Council

10.30am        Cultural Tourism – Buxton’s big opportunity! James Berresford, Chair, Buxton Crescent Heritage Trust and formerly Chief Executive, VisitEngland

11am             Q&A followed by tea/coffee

11:30am        The challenge and scope for Cultural Heritage-led Regeneration – Historic England’s perspective, Louise Brennan, Regional Director Midlands, Historic England

12pm            The role of Historic Buildings and the Visitor Economy – the Developer’s perspective, Trevor Osborne, Chair, The Osborne Group and Director, Buxton Crescent Hotel and Thermal Spa Company

12:30pm        Q&A followed by lunch
1:30pm          An Introduction to Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa, Trevor Osborne & Jonathan Dawson, General Manager, Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa

2pm              Walk around the Crescent and Thermal Spa, the Devonshire Dome, Buxton Opera House and the Pump Room

3:30pm          Close

This event is being generously sponsored by High Peak Borough Council, the University of Derby, Buxton Crescent Heritage Trust and Buxton Crescent and Thermal Spa Hotel.

 
 
This event counts as 5 hours of CPD. Join the HTVF now and save money - see http://www.htvf.org/Join/ for details. 
 

 

 

Forthcoming events:


 

Character, Quality and Design Codes in Neighbourhood Planning and beyond 

Autumn 2019, Kellogg College, Oxford
This seminar-workshop will explore how to get involved in the design quality of new development and why it matters.  In neighbourhood planning, much of the debate so far has been dominated by questions of 'How much development?' and 'Where, if at all?', but far less consideration has gone into defining the quality of development coming to smaller settlements.
While local planning authorities may have the resources draw up design briefs and codes for large development sites, many smaller, but no less significant, developments are being built with little local design consideration, and with street layouts and architectural styles that are the same around the country.
Following on from our previous Understanding Local Distinctiveness seminar, this event will explore how to learn about local character to create better places and capture this in policy.
In this seminar, we will look at:
  • what design quality means and why it matters
  • how to identify key characteristics in the local context
  • how local historical character can inform new development
  • the support now available to communities to develop design codes, and
  • how to draw up design code criteria and test them in a workshop.
Booking details coming soon!
 

Writing Supplementary Planning Documents relating to the Historic Environment


Tuesday 12th November 2019, Kellogg College, Oxford

This seminar-workshop will look at best practice examples of how to prepare policies for historic environments, with hands-on opportunities to test successful strategies.  

 


 



Bath: Managing Contemporary and Historic Design and Development

Spring 2020, Bath (date to be confirmed)  
In association with City of Bath World Heritage Site Advisory Board and Bath Preservation Trust, we are planning our next annual seminar-walking tour to look at how modern and historic developments are designed and managed, with reference to recent developments in this iconic city.

 

Coming later this year!

Autumn 2019 - Developing the Visitor Economy: Town Trails (locations and dates to be announced)
Autumn/ Winter School 2019 - Place-making vs. Movement - 2 days of seminars and hands-on workshops on how to manage traffic in a historic county town centre (details coming soon)
Winter - Supporting Historic High Streets:  The Ingredients for Success in the 21st Century - Part 4, Kellogg College, Oxford
Winter/ Spring - Understanding the Regeneration Potential of our Heritage Assets, Kellogg College, Oxford - exploring what makes heritage-led regeneration schemes viable, and how to create greater financial sustainability.
Places on all of our live events can be booked via Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/historic-towns-amp-villages-forum-14604939912
 

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Under Pressure: Working with the form and setting of smaller settlements
Tuesday 6th November 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford
 Bookings via: https://smallersettlementsseminar.eventbrite.co.uk
Tickets from £35-145
 
With small towns, villages and hamlets seeing greater developer interest, what criteria are being used to identify new sites for housing or other land uses beyond major cities?  What can a settlement’s history tell us about its ideal future? What weight should be given to other place-related factors in decision-making?

Spatial planning is intended to determine what and how much development should be located where; yet a key part of the UK planning system encourages land owners and developers to propose specific sites for new development. Given the pressure on local authority resources, time constraints on determining planning applications, and the need for more housing development, place-making is not always at the top of the list of factors being considered.

This seminar-workshop will examine:
  • The significance of smaller settlements’ historical form, function and setting
  • Whether the HELAA process makes spatial or ‘place’ planning more of a challenge
  • Alternative ways of planning for change that relate to a place’s identity
  • The type of criteria to consider and their relevance
  • A live case study to debate and test factors that matter, and
  • Case studies of how plan-making and neighbourhood planning can draw upon alternative evidence to influence outcomes.
With expert speakers and a hands-on workshop, this seminar will enable delegates to consider whether there are key factors that should be used to plan the future of smaller historic settlements differently. 

This seminar will be of interest to local authority officers and councillors, civic societies, amenity and local community groups, and development planning and design consultants with an interest in urban design and planning. 
Programme
 

9.30am
Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45
Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10am
The historical significance of settlement forms, functions and settings, Dr Geoffrey Tyack, Oxford University
10.30am
Planning for growth: small settlements today, the HELAA process and the market, Louise Thomas
11am
Q&A followed by tea and coffee
11.30am
Shaping towns - strategic urban design in the local plan process, Roger Evans, studio REAL
12pm
Using an historical evidence base for planning policy and development management, Charles Wagner, Associate, The Built Heritage Consultancy
12.30
Q&A
1pm
Lunch
1.45pm
Introduction to Workshop
3.15pm
Tea and coffee
3.30pm
Workshop feedback
4pm
Dorchester on Thames Neighbourhood Plan: a case study, Professor Malcolm Airs, Kellogg College
5pm
Close
 
This event counts as 6 hours of CPD. If you need help to arrange accommodation in Oxford for this event, please let us know at htf@kellogg.ox.ac.uk
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Next AGM & Minutes from April 2017 AGM


AGM update: please see our News page for the minutes and reports from 31 January 2019 at http://www.htvf.org/News/

Our next AGM has been rescheduled to 1.30pm on 31 January 2019, and will be very kindly hosted by Bircham Dyson Bell LLP, at 50 Broadway London SW1H 0BL.

If you are planning to attend, please book your place by emailing us at htf@kellogg.ox.ac.uk.
You can download a copy of the 2017 minutes here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1uEu7WZGV-8wcVMmNo8OdInBq0geeuUDV/view?usp=sharing
We look forward to seeing you then,
The HTVF Team
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Save the date!
Understanding Local Distinctiveness: the challenge for new housing in town and country
Thursday 17 January 2019, Nottingham
 

Following great feedback on our hands-on Understanding Local Distinctiveness seminar-workshop last week in Oxford, we are pleased to announce that we are collaborating with the design and planning team at Nottingham City Council to run a similar event in the city. 

Planned for early in the new year at the newly opened Urban Room (as shown), the seminar will see the City Council's own design guide launched in a bid to improve housing design quality.

Watch this space for booking details from Nottingham City Council...


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Cambridge Walking Tour and Seminar 20th November 2018

 
Managing Contemporary and Historic Design and Development - Cambridge
 
Tuesday 20th November 2018
Wesley House, Jesus Lane, Cambridge CB5 8BJ

Bookings now open:
 
 The city of Cambridge is known world-wide for its historic built environment - the architecture and spaces of its university and 31 colleges.  With a global reputation for excellence in higher education and spin-off research companies, the city is experiencing considerable growth and provides fascinating exemplars for how to manage historic environments and embrace challenging new development.

Hosted by Cambridge City Council
 
This two-part seminar and walking tour is an opportunity to visit developments built in the last 10 years in their urban context, and discuss new proposals which seek to capitalise on the city’s historic and contemporary success.

This event will be useful to local authority officers and councillors with planning and design portfolios, conservation officers, developers, architects, urban designers and planners in private practice, town and parish councillors, and civic society members.  The benefits of attending this seminar are:


·                    A first-hand appreciation of contemporary development within an historic setting

·                    An understanding of how planning guidance and decision-making frameworks are established and used

·                    The opportunity to discuss guidance and its interpretation with key figures in the city

·                    An awareness of the main issues for guiding and promoting good contemporary design
·                    An appreciation of key conservation and urban design principles
·                    Greater confidence in decision-making on design in historic places or conservation area settings.

MORNING PROGRAMME

9:30am

Tea and coffee on arrival

9.45am

Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director

10am

Conservation Principles and Tools, Christian Brady, Principal Conservation and Design Officer, Cambridge City Council

10.30am

Current Major Design and Heritage Challenges, Christian Brady, Jonathan Hurst and Susan Smith, Conservation and Design Officers, Cambridge City Council

11am

Cambridge’s Conflicting Pressures and the Challenges in Promoting New Development, Jenni Mason, Associate Director, Heritage, Turley

11.30am

Tea and Coffee

12pm

Balancing the Pressure for Growth and Design Quality, Stacey Weiser, Cambridge Past Present and Future

12.30pm

Q&A with panel discussion

1pm

Lunch

 1.45pm            Walking Tour leaving from Wesley House, Jesus Lane, Cambridge, led by Christian Brady, Principal Conservation and Design Officer, Cambridge City Council looking at a range of contemporary architectural schemes in Cambridge’s historic urban centre:
  • Wesley House, Wesley College (Cowper Griffiths Architects 2017)
  • West Court, Jesus College (Niall McLaughlin Architects 2017) and internal viewing
  • Grand Arcade shopping centre (Add Architects 2008)
  • University Arms Hotel (John Simpson Architects 2018)
  • Cambridge Fire Station (Glenn Howells Architects 2013)
  • Hilton Hotel, Downing Street
  • Downing Site & Old Press/ Mill Lane Sites
  •  Judge School of Business, Grade II* listed (Matthew Digby Wyatt 1866, John Outram 1995, Stanton Williams 2018) and internal viewing

     Optional visit en route to the station (depending on daylight):
  • Sainsbury Laboratory and café in Cambridge University Botanic Gardens (Stanton Williams 2010) (with extra charge to enter gardens), OR
  • Accordia housing development (Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, Alison Brooks Architects and Macreanor Lavington 2003-), and
  • Cambridge’s Station Quarter (masterplan by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners 2004-8).

This event will count as 5 hours of CPD. 
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The Role of Volunteers in Planning and Heritage: Tuesday 16th October



The Role of Volunteers in Planning and Heritage:

Issues, Toolkits and Expectations

Tuesday 16th October 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford

 As local authorities see their resources reduced each year, many have developed innovative ways of working with local communities to support the historic environment. The 2012 Localism Act has also brought great changes in how local people interact with the planning system, with groups around the country taking more control over the future of neighbourhoods - new and old. This full day seminar looks at the role that volunteers can play in recording, preserving and initiating heritage-related projects, and how to manage these new ways of working together.

Our speakers will address how far neighbourhood planning has come today, how communities can be supported in developing plans for their areas, ways of tapping into local passions for heritage, and starting new projects from a grass-roots perspective.


The benefits of attending this seminar are:

·         learning how other places are filling resource or skills gaps

·         looking at the potential heritage issues, toolkits and volunteer expectations involved; 

·         a better understanding of the funding available to support communities;

·         developing ideas for successful volunteer projects; and

·         considering how communities can take the lead, using local knowledge and expertise, and setting the agenda for neighbourhood planning or saving historic buildings, structures and places.

This event will be of interest to local authority officers and members, town and parish councils, local civic or amenity groups, as well as design and planning consultants seeking better ways of engaging local communities and groups.

PROGRAMME

9.30am
Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45
Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10am
Neighbourhood Planning in 2018, Tony Burton, independent community and neighbourhood planner
10.30am
Supporting communities through the Heritage Lottery Fund, Sara Crofts, Head of Historic Environment, Heritage Lottery Fund
11am
Q&A followed by tea and coffee
11.30am
Undertaking a Conservation Area Appraisal, Susy Shearer, local historian and community engagement specialist, Windsor Neighbourhood Plan Forum member
12pm
Counting our heritage: an example of how local authorities can use volunteers, Richard Tuffrey, High Peak Borough & Staffordshire Moorlands Council
12.30
Q&A
1pm
Lunch
1.45pm
Peckham Coal Line – What community-led visions can do, Colin Sterling, Peckham Coal Line Steering Group
2.15pm
Toolkits to support greater involvement, Louise Thomas, HTVF
2.45pm
Tea and coffee
3pm
Workshop on the Role of Volunteers & Discussion
4pm
Close
 
 
This event will count as 6 hours of CPD. We look forward to seeing you there!
 
Please note: the AGM has been rescheduled to Tuesday 29th January 2019 - see details further up this page

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Understanding Local Distinctiveness seminar: Wednesday 12 September 2018

 
Understanding Local Distinctiveness: the challenge for new housing in town and country


Wednesday 12th September 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford
Bookings are now open for this event via
As development pressures are now being felt by settlements large and small, urban and rural, do we really understand what makes these places special and distinctive?



It is easy to find places around the UK where the quality and design of new housing creates a sense of placelessness, where the local context has played little part in the layout of new development, or where the visual appearance of new buildings bears little relationship to the area in general. 

Pin-pointing what makes one settlement different to the next is about identifying common characteristics, but also the variations between them due to topography, natural features, boundaries, links to elsewhere, materials and building types, and more. Without this detailed appreciation of context, how can we ensure that future development does not dilute local distinctiveness?   

House builders and developers, in seeking to operate as efficiently as possible have a library of house plans that are tried and tested in cost, buildability and durability terms.   These are used to suit local housing markets and different plots, but how can local character influence the design, layout and appearance of new development?

In this seminar, we will look beyond architectural pastiche and 'stick-on' architecture features to explore what makes one place different to another.  Finding ways to capture this distinctiveness and convey it to others is the key to sustaining a sense of place.

This seminar will examine:

  • Why local distinctiveness matters
  • How developers view local character in drawing up proposals
  • What makes local distinctiveness or the features that identify local character
  • How to inform plans for change and influence new proposals 
  • The mechanisms to capture local character in the design and planning process.

  

With expert speakers and a hands-on workshop, this seminar will enable delegates to test out toolkits to identify key considerations in local distinctiveness, and develop recommendations on what really matters.  These toolkits will be Oxford City Council's Character Assessment Toolkit and the RTPI's character assessment for neighbourhood plans, and using various areas around central Oxford as testbeds.

This seminar will be of interest to local authority officers and councillors, civic societies, amenity and local community groups, and development planning and design consultants with an interest in urban design.

Programme

9.30am
Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45
Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10am
Why local distinctiveness matters, Ivor Samuels, urban designer, Visiting Professor at Krakow University, and Honorary Senior Research Fellow, Urban Morphology Research Group, Birmingham University
10.30am
Identifying local character in a rural context to inform new development, Louise Thomas
11am
Q&A followed by tea and coffee
11.30am
11.50am
Characterising Neighbourhoods, Richard Guise, Context 4D
Ways of capturing local character in new development, Andrew Raven, Director, Savills Urban Design Studio
12.20pm
Toolkits for defining local distinctiveness & introduction to workshop, Louise Thomas, HTVF
12.45
Q&A
1pm
Lunch
1.45pm
Area site visits for observations
3.15pm
Tea and coffee at Kellogg College
3.30pm
Making Recommendations
5pm
Close

This event counts as 6 hours of CPD.  If you need help to arrange accommodation in Oxford for this event, please let us know at: htf@kellogg.ox.ac.uk
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