Check out the new details on our events planned in September and October at http://www.htvf.org/page/
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Conservation & Urban Design

Available now and free to download - the special issue of the Urban Design Group's quarterly journal Urban Design featuring articles on different ways of valuing, counting, seeing and saving our heritage:

http://www.udg.org.uk/publications/urban-design-journal-issue/urban-design-144
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BOOK REVIEWS
We are interested in receiving book reviews on recent publications, and are delighted to publish our inaugural review...

The Village News, the truth behind England’s rural idyll, by Tom Fort, Simon and Schuster, 2017 £14.99 HB £8.99 PB
ISBN 978-1-4711-5109-5
According to Tom Fort, there is no such thing as a typical English village. Most are determined by their geography, as manifested partly by their local building materials, others by history. Fort’s cycle rides take him from the Durham coalfields, to picturesque Devon and Cornwall and most counties in between. Many villages are ancient, though some, like his own of Sonning Common, are a mere 100 years old. Those spawned by the Industrial Revolution were thrown up rapidly and cheaply, while others grew in a slow, organic fashion. Yet what links them over a 1,500 year period is that their raison d’être was to work the land, whether on or below the surface.
Fort confirms that the English village is still alive, but barely kicking. Indeed, despite the Black Death, industrialisation, parliamentary enclosures and other losses undermining village life, it managed to survive, until the late 19th century. Then what we now call gentrification and suburbanisation engulfed Bourne near Farnham, as Surrey succumbed. More recently it has been  prosperity (for some) in the form of holiday homes, visited once or twice a year, that  has sucked the communal life from villages further afield, driven its young away to find low-cost housing, and often killed off the civic institutions that kept them alive. The last straw was the mechanisation of agriculture brought about by the two world wars. With agriculture died the crafts and trades associated with rural life, though TV programmes like the Victorian Farm series suggest many people are reviving or still practising old crafts.
Fort delves into the history of each place, often finding a piece of literature, like Sturt’s Change in the Village, Lee’s Cider with Rosie or a written local history like The History of Myddle to compare past with present.  He also talks to the locals, to take the measure of its communal spirit.
Heritage professionals will deplore many of his conclusions. He would like a bonfire of conservation policies like AONBs and Conservation Areas. He castigates the National Trust for preserving picturesque villages at the expense of housing locals in new buildings. But he rightly abhors the volume housebuilders with their dull and derivative designs, while he recommends de-suburbanisation by building at higher densities and the use of local building materials - essential to preserve the variety and character of an area. ‘The best of England is a village’, but that is only true if you can find a beautiful and thriving one.
Dr Linda Hall, Heritage Champion and Councillor, Tunbridge Wells Borough Council

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Just a thought from the HTVF team...
If you'd really like to come to one of our events in Oxford, but the thought of getting here for an early morning start is off-putting, please let us know and we can find out whether there is overnight accommodation available in College or other University centres...
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Under Pressure: Working with the form and setting of smaller settlements
Tuesday 6th November 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford (Please note new date) See our Events page for more details http://www.htvf.org/Events/
 
9.30am
Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45
Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10am
The historical significance of settlement forms, functions and settings
10.30am
Planning for growth: small settlements today, the HELAA process and the market
11am
Q&A followed by tea and coffee
11.30am
Sieving or planning for growth? Alternative approaches and the value of place
12pm
Re-shaping growth plans for small settlements: case study
12.45
Q&A
1pm
Lunch
1.45pm
Introduction to Workshop
3.15pm
Tea and coffee
3.30pm
Workshop feedback
4pm
Using historical evidence in neighbourhood planning: case study
5pm
Close
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Bookings open for this event!


Understanding Local Distinctiveness:

the challenge for new housing in town and country
Wednesday 12th September 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford
 
9.30am
Tea and coffee on arrival
9.45
Welcome, Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10am
Why local distinctiveness matters, Professor Ivor Samuels
10.30am
Identifying local character in a rural context to inform new development, Louise Thomas
11am
Q&A followed by tea and coffee
11.30am
Ways of capturing local character in new development, Andrew Raven, Director, Savills Urban Design Studio
12pm
Toolkits for defining local distinctiveness & introduction to workshop, Louise Thomas, HTVF
12.45
Q&A
1pm
Lunch
1.45pm
Area site visits for observations
3.15pm
Tea and coffee at Kellogg College
3.30pm
Making Recommendations
5pm
Close
 
 

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SAVE THE DATES!
 
We are currently planning events over the Summer and Autumn:
 
Thursday 7th June - Understanding Local Distinctiveness: the challenge for new housing in town and country, Oxford 
A full day seminar and hands-on workshop examining what we mean by local distinctiveness, why it matters, how new development seeks to respond to it, the mechanisms to capture important local characteristics in planning, and testing one of two toolkits to identify how to do this in practice, run in partnership with BOBMK - the local design and planning authority network for Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes.
Bookings now open: : https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/understanding-local-distinctiveness-the-challenge-for-new-housing-in-town-and-country-tickets-45584040091?ref=estw

Wednesday 12th September - Under Pressure: Working with the form, function and setting of smaller settlements, Oxford 
A full day seminar and hands-on workshop exploring how smaller settlements have evolved and their functions today, how the current planning system manages demand for growth, and testing out what the main considerations should be in managing change in small towns, villages and hamlets, in partnership with the Urban Design Group.

September (date to be confirmed) - Managing Contemporary and Historic Design and Development #2 - Cambridge
A full day visit to new developments in and around the city, with group travel options from Oxford too, in partnership with BOBMK.

Tuesday 16th October - The Role of Volunteers in Planning and Heritage: Issues, Toolkits and Expectations, Oxford
A full day seminar and hands-on workshop looking at how volunteers can support local planning authorities to identify, monitor and protect built heritage, as well as how communities themselves can use planning toolkits effectively to identify and improve local heritage and much values places.
Followed at 5pm by the HTVF's Annual General Meeting, Kellogg College, Oxford.


We'll publish more details once bookings open....

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Thanks to all of our speakers and delegates at our two part seminar series - we are planning more for the spring-summer, and so do watch this space! 
If you have a suggestion for an event, we are always open to ideas.
The HTVF team
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Tuesday 20thMarch 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford
Supporting Historic High Streets:
The Ingredients for Success in the 21st Century - Part 2
 

Last chance to book!



9.30am
Tea and coffee on arrival
10.am
Welcome & Recap from Ingredients seminar Part #1,
Louise Thomas, HTVF Director
10.15am
Promoting mixed modes of travel/ Oxford City Centre Study, Phil Jones, Phil Jones Associates
10.45am
Who's driving? Town centres in the age of the driverless car, Richard Crappsley, Steer Davies Gleave
11.15am
Tea and coffee
11.45pm
The overwhelming benefits of mature trees in town centres, Howard Gray, GreenBlue Urban
12.15pm
Why better design matters, Vanessa Gregory, Chair, Look! St Albans
12.45
Q&A
1pm
Lunch
1.45
Making Places Work, Paul Clement, Central Management Solutions/ British BIDS
2.15pm
Making the High Street legible, Sue Manley, Placemarque
2.45pm
Supporting local heritage, Oluwaseun Soyemi, Heritage Lottery Fund
3.15pm
Tea and coffee
3.45pm
Leadership, governance and the role of civic societies, Ian Green, Oxford Civic Society
4.15pm
Q&A, Round up and future issues to cover
5pm
Close
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Tuesday 20thMarch 2018, Kellogg College, Oxford
Supporting Historic High Streets: The Ingredients for Success in the 21st Century - Part 2
Bookings being taken now!  Tickets range from £35 to £130
 
Delegates at January's seminar described the speakers and walking tour as 'fascinating' and 'inspiring', and so this second seminar will go on to look at:
  • Strategic transport and movement planning
  • Town centre public realm and places
  • What the arrival of autonomous vehicles might mean
  • The importance of street trees and how to incorporate them
  • Planning for better way-finding
  • How communities can take a lead in design quality
  • Joining places up digitally and through collaboration
  • How funding can support historic townscapes, and
  • The role of civic societies and taking the long view.
Speakers include: Phil Jones - Phil Jones Associates, Richard Crappsley - Steer Davies Gleave, Howard Gray - GreenBlue Urban, Vanessa Gregory - Look! St Albans, Paul Clement -Central Management Solutions & British BIDS, Sue Manley – Placemarque, Oluwaseun Soyemi - Heritage Lottery Fund, and Ian Green - Oxford Civic Society.
Come along to find out more, and look out for our Part 3 seminar later in 2018!



 
 
 




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